Fudo Myo-o

A work made of wood with polychromy and gilt-bronze accessories.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of wood with polychromy and gilt-bronze accessories.

Date:

12th/14th century

Artist:

Japan

About this artwork

The name Fudo Myo-o means “the immovable or unshakable one.” He is one of five myo-o, or lords of light, whose threatening appearance guards the Law of Buddhism. He is equipped to guide the spiritual traveler past temptation on the path to enlightenment. Fudo’s bulging eyes, piercing stare, and protruding fangs express the intensity of his wrath against evil. Seated on a stylized rock formation that symbolizes his steadfastness, he once held his attributes, a rope and sword (these have been removed for conservation), which were used to subdue evil forces and to cut through the ignorance that is the source of suffering. This finely modeled figure reflects the highly detailed, realistic direction taken by Japanese sculptors in the Kamakura period (1185–1333).

On View

Asian Art, Gallery 103

Title

Fudo Myo-o

Origin

Japan

Date

1199–1399

Medium

Wood with polychromy and gilt-bronze accessories

Dimensions

41.6 cm (16 3/8 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of the Joseph and Helen Regenstein Foundation

Reference Number

1958.321

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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